felinefantasy

May 11, 2013

Love the Smiths. Love the Cure. Love Siouxsie and The Banshees. Not to name drop, but I'm really close friends with another one of the bands listed, however, not a huge fan of their music, but the connections I made from them are awesome. 

 

If you can't eat tacos for Cinco de Mayo, then you shouldn't be able to eat hot dogs, hamburgers, and apple pie on the 4th of July.

Fuck that shit.


_hearmerawr_

May 11, 2013

What I dont understand is why is Cinco De Mayo celebrations seen as racist, what about St. Patricks Day, if I was Irish I would be PISSED. SO MANY STEREOTYPES.

DrGeniusWiener

May 11, 2013

Chances are you'd just be drunk.

felinefantasy

May 11, 2013

Real Irish people don't celebrate St Paddy's day because St Patrick was a dickhole. 

_hearmerawr_

May 11, 2013

And real Mexican people dont celebrate Cinco De Mayo. 

felinefantasy

May 11, 2013

Isn't that like your 4th of July though?

DrGeniusWiener

May 11, 2013

I think there's a whole thread about that somewhere around here, Miss siftbro.

And no marriemammy. It's about their victory over the French at the 'Battle of Puebla'.

But then again I'm not a real Mexican so you might wanna google that.

_hearmerawr_

May 11, 2013

TBH I am the last person you want to ask about "Mexican" things. I dont know Spanish, I dont date Hispanics and Ive only been to Mexico twice in my life. 

MsOtis

May 11, 2013

nice talk about the music, tho. Bookmarked that multi-CD, MissBro, so thanks.

_hearmerawr_

May 11, 2013

^ You're welcome. It makes me sad that when someone broke into my car, they stole those CD's. 

Sushibitch

May 11, 2013

what about St. Patricks Day, if I was Irish I would be PISSED. SO MANY STEREOTYPES.

Yeah, a lot of actual Irish people do think it's racist. Or just, y'know, dumb.

Real Irish people don't celebrate St Paddy's day because St Patrick was a dickhole.

Where on earth do you get that impression? They don't celebrate it the same way the Americans do, but they certainly mark it; at least, the Irish side of my family all do, as do all my Irish friends (where by "Irish" I mean "Born and raised in Ireland").

DrGeniusWiener

May 11, 2013

Marriedmammy is really Irish so this should be good.

felinefantasy

May 11, 2013

Where on earth do you get that impression?

IDK, history...

Gosh, Sushi is arguing about something I post.

Perish the thought.

Can't be so.

She NEVER does that.

It's so out of her character.


DrGeniusWiener

May 11, 2013

Well there you have it.

And top of the mornin to ya!

Sushibitch

May 11, 2013

Where on earth do you get that impression?

IDK, history...

Could you point to your sources? Because as I say, all the actually Irish from Ireland people I know (including my dad and his family) do in fact celebrate or mark St Patrick's day, so it seems to me that your "history" may be a little confused there.

Gosh, Sushi is arguing about something I post.

Well, yes, because it's wrong. If someone else had said the same thing, I'd have disagreed with them too.


MsOtis

May 11, 2013

Saint Patrick's Day is observed on March 17, the date of his death.[12] It is celebrated both inside and outside Ireland, as both a religious and, especially outside Ireland, secular holiday. In the dioceses of Ireland, it is both a solemnity and a holy day of obligation; outside Ireland, it can be a celebration of Ireland itself.

I always celebrate St. Patrick's day with my Irish friends, who serve green beer, green eggs, and, yes, ham.

felinefantasy

May 11, 2013

Could you point to your sources? Because as I say, all the actually Irish from Ireland people I know (including my dad and his family) do in fact celebrate or mark St Patrick's day, so it seems to me that your "history" may be a little confused there.

It's not.

I'm sure of it.

I don't need your seal of approval for this.

Thanks though.

 

DrGeniusWiener

May 11, 2013

^Irish.

felinefantasy

May 11, 2013

...as fuck.

If you don't say that part, it's not true.

Sushibitch

May 11, 2013

^^^ You're sure that real Irish people don't celebrate St Patrick's day? Even though it's a national holiday in Ireland? And even though two seconds on Google will confirm that it is indeed celebrated in Ireland and has been, in one form or another, for several hundred years)?

Gosh, it must be nice to be so easily assured.

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