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matadora_78

35 F Houston, DE

My Details

Last Online
Sep 21, 2007
Orientation
Straight
Ethnicity
Asian, Hispanic / Latin, White
Height
5′ 5″ (1.65m)
Body Type
Diet
Smokes
No
Drinks
Socially
Drugs
Never
Religion
Sign
Sagittarius, but it doesn’t matter
Education
Job
Income
Relationship Status
Seeing Someone
Relationship Type
Offspring
Pets
Speaks
English (Fluently)

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Write a little about yourself. Just a paragraph will do.
Little Rock - As the Hispanic community in Arkansas grows, so does the need for Spanish interpreters and translators.

But just because someone speaks Spanish, that doesn’t make them qualified to be an interpreter or a translator. That's why a business in Little Rock offers a service that is in demand now more than ever.

(Estela Mendoza, Executive Director) “The Hispanic community, as I understand it, is growing 333% per year--so I've seen a growth, yes.”

Estela Mendoza is originally from Cuba, and came to Arkansas in 1994. She started what is now the Arkansas Institute of Languages--and Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators.

Mendoza says the certified interpreters they offer go on-site for whatever a client needs.

(Mendoza) “It could be a transaction at a bank. It could be someone going to a doctor's office. It could be someone that wants to enroll in school and needs an interpreter so we do everything that the community would need.”

Meanwhile, the translators turn documents written in English into Spanish.

(Mendoza) “We're very meticulous with this because there's a lot of errors that could happen of the written word.”

Mendoza says with such a booming Hispanic population, it's important to offer the community a way to communicate with one another.

(Mendoza) “Our stress is to be accurate and precise and exact because we can not take any chances on mis-translations or people that have errors or omissions.”

For more information on Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators, click here.

» Find More Articles Related To This One

Copyright 2007 KATV, LLC

HAVE AN OPINION ON THIS STORY? TELL US ABOUT IT BELOW!

Viewer Comments on Metro Latino: Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators nativeamericanwhitegirl IP: Logged Posted: 08/15 12:06p ET Ok, I agree that the spanish need to learn english to live here,,,many of them are trying very hard and those who are not trying to learn the language are handicapping themselves....but...it is a very hard language to learn and it requires patience on everyones part. I have many bilingual friends,,,spanish, white and black,,,it took then alot of time to learn spanish or english ,,,so with some patience and working together maybe we can all be bilingual....it couldn't hurt !

happywife IP: Logged Posted: 08/14 6:24p ET I know working in special education, I have to have all of the paperwork translated and have a translator at all conferences. It is so difficult to find someone to translate. I am always grateful to have parents that speak English.



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Little Rock - As the Hispanic community in Arkansas grows, so does the need for Spanish interpreters and translators.

But just because someone speaks Spanish, that doesn’t make them qualified to be an interpreter or a translator. That's why a business in Little Rock offers a service that is in demand now more than ever.

(Estela Mendoza, Executive Director) “The Hispanic community, as I understand it, is growing 333% per year--so I've seen a growth, yes.”

Estela Mendoza is originally from Cuba, and came to Arkansas in 1994. She started what is now the Arkansas Institute of Languages--and Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators.

Mendoza says the certified interpreters they offer go on-site for whatever a client needs.

(Mendoza) “It could be a transaction at a bank. It could be someone going to a doctor's office. It could be someone that wants to enroll in school and needs an interpreter so we do everything that the community would need.”

Meanwhile, the translators turn documents written in English into Spanish.

(Mendoza) “We're very meticulous with this because there's a lot of errors that could happen of the written word.”

Mendoza says with such a booming Hispanic population, it's important to offer the community a way to communicate with one another.

(Mendoza) “Our stress is to be accurate and precise and exact because we can not take any chances on mis-translations or people that have errors or omissions.”

For more information on Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators, click here.

» Find More Articles Related To This One

Copyright 2007 KATV, LLC

HAVE AN OPINION ON THIS STORY? TELL US ABOUT IT BELOW!

Viewer Comments on Metro Latino: Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators nativeamericanwhitegirl IP: Logged Posted: 08/15 12:06p ET Ok, I agree that the spanish need to learn english to live here,,,many of them are trying very hard and those who are not trying to learn the language are handicapping themselves....but...it is a very hard language to learn and it requires patience on everyones part. I have many bilingual friends,,,spanish, white and black,,,it took then alot of time to learn spanish or english ,,,so with some patience and working together maybe we can all be bilingual....it couldn't hurt !

happywife IP: Logged Posted: 08/14 6:24p ET I know working in special education, I have to have all of the paperwork translated and have a translator at all conferences. It is so difficult to find someone to translate. I am always grateful to have parents that speak English.

I’m really good at
Go on, brag a little (or a lot). We won’t judge.
Little Rock - As the Hispanic community in Arkansas grows, so does the need for Spanish interpreters and translators.

But just because someone speaks Spanish, that doesn’t make them qualified to be an interpreter or a translator. That's why a business in Little Rock offers a service that is in demand now more than ever.

(Estela Mendoza, Executive Director) “The Hispanic community, as I understand it, is growing 333% per year--so I've seen a growth, yes.”

Estela Mendoza is originally from Cuba, and came to Arkansas in 1994. She started what is now the Arkansas Institute of Languages--and Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators.

Mendoza says the certified interpreters they offer go on-site for whatever a client needs.

(Mendoza) “It could be a transaction at a bank. It could be someone going to a doctor's office. It could be someone that wants to enroll in school and needs an interpreter so we do everything that the community would need.”

Meanwhile, the translators turn documents written in English into Spanish.

(Mendoza) “We're very meticulous with this because there's a lot of errors that could happen of the written word.”

Mendoza says with such a booming Hispanic population, it's important to offer the community a way to communicate with one another.

(Mendoza) “Our stress is to be accurate and precise and exact because we can not take any chances on mis-translations or people that have errors or omissions.”

For more information on Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators, click here.

» Find More Articles Related To This One

Copyright 2007 KATV, LLC

HAVE AN OPINION ON THIS STORY? TELL US ABOUT IT BELOW!

Viewer Comments on Metro Latino: Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators nativeamericanwhitegirl IP: Logged Posted: 08/15 12:06p ET Ok, I agree that the spanish need to learn english to live here,,,many of them are trying very hard and those who are not trying to learn the language are handicapping themselves....but...it is a very hard language to learn and it requires patience on everyones part. I have many bilingual friends,,,spanish, white and black,,,it took then alot of time to learn spanish or english ,,,so with some patience and working together maybe we can all be bilingual....it couldn't hurt !

happywife IP: Logged Posted: 08/14 6:24p ET I know working in special education, I have to have all of the paperwork translated and have a translator at all conferences. It is so difficult to find someone to translate. I am always grateful to have parents that speak English.

The first things people usually notice about me
I’m an empty essay… fill me out!
Little Rock - As the Hispanic community in Arkansas grows, so does the need for Spanish interpreters and translators.

But just because someone speaks Spanish, that doesn’t make them qualified to be an interpreter or a translator. That's why a business in Little Rock offers a service that is in demand now more than ever.

(Estela Mendoza, Executive Director) “The Hispanic community, as I understand it, is growing 333% per year--so I've seen a growth, yes.”

Estela Mendoza is originally from Cuba, and came to Arkansas in 1994. She started what is now the Arkansas Institute of Languages--and Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators.

Mendoza says the certified interpreters they offer go on-site for whatever a client needs.

(Mendoza) “It could be a transaction at a bank. It could be someone going to a doctor's office. It could be someone that wants to enroll in school and needs an interpreter so we do everything that the community would need.”

Meanwhile, the translators turn documents written in English into Spanish.

(Mendoza) “We're very meticulous with this because there's a lot of errors that could happen of the written word.”

Mendoza says with such a booming Hispanic population, it's important to offer the community a way to communicate with one another.

(Mendoza) “Our stress is to be accurate and precise and exact because we can not take any chances on mis-translations or people that have errors or omissions.”

For more information on Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators, click here.

» Find More Articles Related To This One

Copyright 2007 KATV, LLC

HAVE AN OPINION ON THIS STORY? TELL US ABOUT IT BELOW!

Viewer Comments on Metro Latino: Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators nativeamericanwhitegirl IP: Logged Posted: 08/15 12:06p ET Ok, I agree that the spanish need to learn english to live here,,,many of them are trying very hard and those who are not trying to learn the language are handicapping themselves....but...it is a very hard language to learn and it requires patience on everyones part. I have many bilingual friends,,,spanish, white and black,,,it took then alot of time to learn spanish or english ,,,so with some patience and working together maybe we can all be bilingual....it couldn't hurt !

happywife IP: Logged Posted: 08/14 6:24p ET I know working in special education, I have to have all of the paperwork translated and have a translator at all conferences. It is so difficult to find someone to translate. I am always grateful to have parents that speak English.

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Help your potential matches find common interests.
Little Rock - As the Hispanic community in Arkansas grows, so does the need for Spanish interpreters and translators.

But just because someone speaks Spanish, that doesn’t make them qualified to be an interpreter or a translator. That's why a business in Little Rock offers a service that is in demand now more than ever.

(Estela Mendoza, Executive Director) “The Hispanic community, as I understand it, is growing 333% per year--so I've seen a growth, yes.”

Estela Mendoza is originally from Cuba, and came to Arkansas in 1994. She started what is now the Arkansas Institute of Languages--and Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators.

Mendoza says the certified interpreters they offer go on-site for whatever a client needs.

(Mendoza) “It could be a transaction at a bank. It could be someone going to a doctor's office. It could be someone that wants to enroll in school and needs an interpreter so we do everything that the community would need.”

Meanwhile, the translators turn documents written in English into Spanish.

(Mendoza) “We're very meticulous with this because there's a lot of errors that could happen of the written word.”

Mendoza says with such a booming Hispanic population, it's important to offer the community a way to communicate with one another.

(Mendoza) “Our stress is to be accurate and precise and exact because we can not take any chances on mis-translations or people that have errors or omissions.”

For more information on Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators, click here.

» Find More Articles Related To This One

Copyright 2007 KATV, LLC

HAVE AN OPINION ON THIS STORY? TELL US ABOUT IT BELOW!

Viewer Comments on Metro Latino: Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators nativeamericanwhitegirl IP: Logged Posted: 08/15 12:06p ET Ok, I agree that the spanish need to learn english to live here,,,many of them are trying very hard and those who are not trying to learn the language are handicapping themselves....but...it is a very hard language to learn and it requires patience on everyones part. I have many bilingual friends,,,spanish, white and black,,,it took then alot of time to learn spanish or english ,,,so with some patience and working together maybe we can all be bilingual....it couldn't hurt !

happywife IP: Logged Posted: 08/14 6:24p ET I know working in special education, I have to have all of the paperwork translated and have a translator at all conferences. It is so difficult to find someone to translate. I am always grateful to have parents that speak English.

The six things I could never do without
Think outside the box. Sometimes the little things can say a lot.
Little Rock - As the Hispanic community in Arkansas grows, so does the need for Spanish interpreters and translators.

But just because someone speaks Spanish, that doesn’t make them qualified to be an interpreter or a translator. That's why a business in Little Rock offers a service that is in demand now more than ever.

(Estela Mendoza, Executive Director) “The Hispanic community, as I understand it, is growing 333% per year--so I've seen a growth, yes.”

Estela Mendoza is originally from Cuba, and came to Arkansas in 1994. She started what is now the Arkansas Institute of Languages--and Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators.

Mendoza says the certified interpreters they offer go on-site for whatever a client needs.

(Mendoza) “It could be a transaction at a bank. It could be someone going to a doctor's office. It could be someone that wants to enroll in school and needs an interpreter so we do everything that the community would need.”

Meanwhile, the translators turn documents written in English into Spanish.

(Mendoza) “We're very meticulous with this because there's a lot of errors that could happen of the written word.”

Mendoza says with such a booming Hispanic population, it's important to offer the community a way to communicate with one another.

(Mendoza) “Our stress is to be accurate and precise and exact because we can not take any chances on mis-translations or people that have errors or omissions.”

For more information on Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators, click here.

» Find More Articles Related To This One

Copyright 2007 KATV, LLC

HAVE AN OPINION ON THIS STORY? TELL US ABOUT IT BELOW!

Viewer Comments on Metro Latino: Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators nativeamericanwhitegirl IP: Logged Posted: 08/15 12:06p ET Ok, I agree that the spanish need to learn english to live here,,,many of them are trying very hard and those who are not trying to learn the language are handicapping themselves....but...it is a very hard language to learn and it requires patience on everyones part. I have many bilingual friends,,,spanish, white and black,,,it took then alot of time to learn spanish or english ,,,so with some patience and working together maybe we can all be bilingual....it couldn't hurt !

happywife IP: Logged Posted: 08/14 6:24p ET I know working in special education, I have to have all of the paperwork translated and have a translator at all conferences. It is so difficult to find someone to translate. I am always grateful to have parents that speak English.

I spend a lot of time thinking about
Global warming, lunch, or your next vacation… it’s all fair game.
Little Rock - As the Hispanic community in Arkansas grows, so does the need for Spanish interpreters and translators.

But just because someone speaks Spanish, that doesn’t make them qualified to be an interpreter or a translator. That's why a business in Little Rock offers a service that is in demand now more than ever.

(Estela Mendoza, Executive Director) “The Hispanic community, as I understand it, is growing 333% per year--so I've seen a growth, yes.”

Estela Mendoza is originally from Cuba, and came to Arkansas in 1994. She started what is now the Arkansas Institute of Languages--and Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators.

Mendoza says the certified interpreters they offer go on-site for whatever a client needs.

(Mendoza) “It could be a transaction at a bank. It could be someone going to a doctor's office. It could be someone that wants to enroll in school and needs an interpreter so we do everything that the community would need.”

Meanwhile, the translators turn documents written in English into Spanish.

(Mendoza) “We're very meticulous with this because there's a lot of errors that could happen of the written word.”

Mendoza says with such a booming Hispanic population, it's important to offer the community a way to communicate with one another.

(Mendoza) “Our stress is to be accurate and precise and exact because we can not take any chances on mis-translations or people that have errors or omissions.”

For more information on Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators, click here.

» Find More Articles Related To This One

Copyright 2007 KATV, LLC

HAVE AN OPINION ON THIS STORY? TELL US ABOUT IT BELOW!

Viewer Comments on Metro Latino: Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators nativeamericanwhitegirl IP: Logged Posted: 08/15 12:06p ET Ok, I agree that the spanish need to learn english to live here,,,many of them are trying very hard and those who are not trying to learn the language are handicapping themselves....but...it is a very hard language to learn and it requires patience on everyones part. I have many bilingual friends,,,spanish, white and black,,,it took then alot of time to learn spanish or english ,,,so with some patience and working together maybe we can all be bilingual....it couldn't hurt !

happywife IP: Logged Posted: 08/14 6:24p ET I know working in special education, I have to have all of the paperwork translated and have a translator at all conferences. It is so difficult to find someone to translate. I am always grateful to have parents that speak English.

On a typical Friday night I am
Netflix and takeout, or getting your party on — how do you let loose?
Little Rock - As the Hispanic community in Arkansas grows, so does the need for Spanish interpreters and translators.

But just because someone speaks Spanish, that doesn’t make them qualified to be an interpreter or a translator. That's why a business in Little Rock offers a service that is in demand now more than ever.

(Estela Mendoza, Executive Director) “The Hispanic community, as I understand it, is growing 333% per year--so I've seen a growth, yes.”

Estela Mendoza is originally from Cuba, and came to Arkansas in 1994. She started what is now the Arkansas Institute of Languages--and Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators.

Mendoza says the certified interpreters they offer go on-site for whatever a client needs.

(Mendoza) “It could be a transaction at a bank. It could be someone going to a doctor's office. It could be someone that wants to enroll in school and needs an interpreter so we do everything that the community would need.”

Meanwhile, the translators turn documents written in English into Spanish.

(Mendoza) “We're very meticulous with this because there's a lot of errors that could happen of the written word.”

Mendoza says with such a booming Hispanic population, it's important to offer the community a way to communicate with one another.

(Mendoza) “Our stress is to be accurate and precise and exact because we can not take any chances on mis-translations or people that have errors or omissions.”

For more information on Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators, click here.

» Find More Articles Related To This One

Copyright 2007 KATV, LLC

HAVE AN OPINION ON THIS STORY? TELL US ABOUT IT BELOW!

Viewer Comments on Metro Latino: Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators nativeamericanwhitegirl IP: Logged Posted: 08/15 12:06p ET Ok, I agree that the spanish need to learn english to live here,,,many of them are trying very hard and those who are not trying to learn the language are handicapping themselves....but...it is a very hard language to learn and it requires patience on everyones part. I have many bilingual friends,,,spanish, white and black,,,it took then alot of time to learn spanish or english ,,,so with some patience and working together maybe we can all be bilingual....it couldn't hurt !

happywife IP: Logged Posted: 08/14 6:24p ET I know working in special education, I have to have all of the paperwork translated and have a translator at all conferences. It is so difficult to find someone to translate. I am always grateful to have parents that speak English.

The most private thing I’m willing to admit
I’m an empty essay… fill me out!
Little Rock - As the Hispanic community in Arkansas grows, so does the need for Spanish interpreters and translators.

But just because someone speaks Spanish, that doesn’t make them qualified to be an interpreter or a translator. That's why a business in Little Rock offers a service that is in demand now more than ever.

(Estela Mendoza, Executive Director) “The Hispanic community, as I understand it, is growing 333% per year--so I've seen a growth, yes.”

Estela Mendoza is originally from Cuba, and came to Arkansas in 1994. She started what is now the Arkansas Institute of Languages--and Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators.

Mendoza says the certified interpreters they offer go on-site for whatever a client needs.

(Mendoza) “It could be a transaction at a bank. It could be someone going to a doctor's office. It could be someone that wants to enroll in school and needs an interpreter so we do everything that the community would need.”

Meanwhile, the translators turn documents written in English into Spanish.

(Mendoza) “We're very meticulous with this because there's a lot of errors that could happen of the written word.”

Mendoza says with such a booming Hispanic population, it's important to offer the community a way to communicate with one another.

(Mendoza) “Our stress is to be accurate and precise and exact because we can not take any chances on mis-translations or people that have errors or omissions.”

For more information on Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators, click here.

» Find More Articles Related To This One

Copyright 2007 KATV, LLC

HAVE AN OPINION ON THIS STORY? TELL US ABOUT IT BELOW!

Viewer Comments on Metro Latino: Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators nativeamericanwhitegirl IP: Logged Posted: 08/15 12:06p ET Ok, I agree that the spanish need to learn english to live here,,,many of them are trying very hard and those who are not trying to learn the language are handicapping themselves....but...it is a very hard language to learn and it requires patience on everyones part. I have many bilingual friends,,,spanish, white and black,,,it took then alot of time to learn spanish or english ,,,so with some patience and working together maybe we can all be bilingual....it couldn't hurt !

happywife IP: Logged Posted: 08/14 6:24p ET I know working in special education, I have to have all of the paperwork translated and have a translator at all conferences. It is so difficult to find someone to translate. I am always grateful to have parents that speak English.

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You should message me if
Offer a few tips to help matches win you over.
Little Rock - As the Hispanic community in Arkansas grows, so does the need for Spanish interpreters and translators.

But just because someone speaks Spanish, that doesn’t make them qualified to be an interpreter or a translator. That's why a business in Little Rock offers a service that is in demand now more than ever.

(Estela Mendoza, Executive Director) “The Hispanic community, as I understand it, is growing 333% per year--so I've seen a growth, yes.”

Estela Mendoza is originally from Cuba, and came to Arkansas in 1994. She started what is now the Arkansas Institute of Languages--and Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators.

Mendoza says the certified interpreters they offer go on-site for whatever a client needs.

(Mendoza) “It could be a transaction at a bank. It could be someone going to a doctor's office. It could be someone that wants to enroll in school and needs an interpreter so we do everything that the community would need.”

Meanwhile, the translators turn documents written in English into Spanish.

(Mendoza) “We're very meticulous with this because there's a lot of errors that could happen of the written word.”

Mendoza says with such a booming Hispanic population, it's important to offer the community a way to communicate with one another.

(Mendoza) “Our stress is to be accurate and precise and exact because we can not take any chances on mis-translations or people that have errors or omissions.”

For more information on Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators, click here.

» Find More Articles Related To This One

Copyright 2007 KATV, LLC

HAVE AN OPINION ON THIS STORY? TELL US ABOUT IT BELOW!

Viewer Comments on Metro Latino: Arkansas Spanish Interpreters and Translators nativeamericanwhitegirl IP: Logged Posted: 08/15 12:06p ET Ok, I agree that the spanish need to learn english to live here,,,many of them are trying very hard and those who are not trying to learn the language are handicapping themselves....but...it is a very hard language to learn and it requires patience on everyones part. I have many bilingual friends,,,spanish, white and black,,,it took then alot of time to learn spanish or english ,,,so with some patience and working together maybe we can all be bilingual....it couldn't hurt !

happywife IP: Logged Posted: 08/14 6:24p ET I know working in special education, I have to have all of the paperwork translated and have a translator at all conferences. It is so difficult to find someone to translate. I am always grateful to have parents that speak English.